All posts by Traci Kinden

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Color: Get in the Driver’s Seat


Anyone who has been in the printing industry very long knows how difficult it is to achieve and maintain great color. Today, customers constantly demand higher quality and more consistency from their print suppliers, which makes color management a critical piece of any successful print business.

Color management processes, tools, and workflows vary from company to company, but they are all designed to bring out the best in each graphic, substrate, and printing device. Printers, presses, and monitors are calibrated to achieve an expected result. Prepress workflows are streamlined, and pass / fail metrics are put in place to verify jobs before they go to press.

These foundational steps optimize performance and accuracy the moment they are implemented, but they don’t control the effects of time. Running jobs, performing maintenance, and even the weather will impact printed color. Still, accuracy is a consistent customer expectation.

Industry leaders control their processes and produce the same high-quality color with consistency over time, taking both color management and profitability to a whole new level. Not only do they calibrate their equipment and streamline their workflows as a part of their color management protocol, they collect performance data over time to decode printer behavior. This enables them to address issues quickly and effectively and achieve superior performance day after day. These pros can anticipate issues before they start and cut crippling color surprises off at the pass.

Accuracy and efficiency are critical to thriving in this industry, because high performance is a widespread customer expectation. While color management practices vary between companies, process control can be applied to any color management system to maintain peak performance. It’s what separates the best from the rest.

Being right once is good. Printing the right color the first time every time is how 21st century pros blow the competition away. They get in the driver’s seat, turn on process control, and leave the past in the dust. Where are you sitting?

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OBAs: New Lights for Viewing Booths (Part 2)


In our last blog we discussed optical brightening agents, or OBAs. If you recall, these are the additives that make whites whiter.

Click here to read the previous post.

OBAs caused issues when they were first introduced to printing substrates, because viewing booth lamps were not designed to activate them. In addition, spectrophotometer lamps didn’t align with the viewing booth lamps, so they ‘saw’ the paper color with OBA content differently than we ‘saw’ the paper color. (Spectros will be discussed in the final blog of this series.) The industry began correcting this misalignment in 2009 by updating D50.

D50 has been the long-time standard lighting condition for the print industry. Until 2009 the standard (ISO3664) defined D50 to contain little to no UV radiation, meaning it didn’t quite simulate natural daylight. This also means prints enhanced with OBAs looked different when being approved in a viewing booth than they did outdoors. Obviously that’s an issue for prints meant to see the light of day.

In 2009 D50 received an overhaul to more closely simulate natural daylight. UV radiation was added to viewing booth lamps so OBAs would fluoresce, or appear whiter and brighter, during visual approvals. As a result, OBA-rich paper stock looked similar outdoors and in the viewing booth under the new 2009 standard.

NOTE: Change always takes time, so it was a few years before the last of the lamps rated to the pre-2009 D50 standard were purchased and installed. Unfortunately, many people only replace their lamps after they burn out, so although manufacturers no longer sell the old product, many booths still have the pre-2009 lamps. Some even have both the old and new D50 lamps in the same booth at the same time

The point of having a viewing booth is to standardize lighting conditions and avoid color surprises. Having conflicting lighting conditions in the same viewing booth does exactly the opposite. Speaking of bad ideas, daylight or grow light lamps are not the same as D50 standard lamps. Grow lights (5000K lamps) are not D50 lamps and should never be used in a viewing booth.

Sunshine

The new D50 standard lamps added UV light to viewing booths so visual approvals done inside looked similar to prints viewed outside. This was an important advancement for accurate print approvals on production paper stocks. Unfortunately, proofing stocks were slower to catch the OBA craze. This caused problems as shops began to replace their old lamps, because press sheets with OBAs and proofing papers without them no longer matched under the new D50 lamps.

As complaints rolled in, viewing booth manufacturers offered a quick fix: A UV filter was placed in front of the lamps to block UV light, and, in effect, converted the new lamps back to the old standard. This allowed proof stocks and press stocks to look the same again, because the OBAs didn’t activate with the UV radiation blocked.

This was a Band-Aid approach. The real issue was the proofing stock needed to incorporate OBAs to match the press stock. We are still in flux about how much OBA content proofing stock should have, but today you can purchase proofing and press stock with similar OBA content.

As time goes on, viewing booths and proofing papers will align with the industry’s use of OBAs. Visual approvals will contain fewer surprises, and the lamp challenges experienced after 2009’s D50 upgrade will become a thing of the past. We will all breathe a sigh of relief, turn to our spectros, and begin the journey once more.

Stay tuned for our upcoming blog on spectrophotometers, OBAs, and how D50 and M1 fit into the mix.

Epson Paper with OBA's

Optical Brightening Agents (OBA): Whiter, Brighter, Better? (Part 1)


Part I – OBAs and Color Reproduction

For printers, color is everything. Even paper has color. Paper color can drastically affect printed color. In the pursuit of predictable color, white isn’t just white anymore.

We’ve all seen ads for toothpaste and laundry detergent promising whiter whites. Optical brightening agents (OBAs) have been added to these products to create the whitening effect. OBAs stay on the surface of fabrics and teeth and literally change the color you see from yellowish to blue-white. Our eyes see blue-white as cleaner and brighter than yellow-white.

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Color Nerds Explain the Basics – Color Spaces


Color Basics

Color is dynamic. We all see it a little differently, because color is the physical response of the eye to light + the mental interpretation of those responses. This makes printing color accurately a bit tricky until one has a basic understanding of color space.

First, all color starts with light. The color of a physical object is the result of projected light reflecting off the object. Your eyes + brain interpret what gets reflected, and the result is the color you see. A red apple, for example, reflects red wavelengths of light and absorbs all others. You see the reflected red wavelengths. As ambient light decreases, colors appear to fade because there is less light and, therefore, less color.

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Pie process control

Using Data: The Process of Pie


One of the best parts of the holidays is the food, especially the pie. Specifically the homemade variety created by someone with a tried, true, and consistent process… Grandma’s finest beats the store-bought variety every time. Believe it or not, color management is much like pie construction. Blend the right components to roll out a great foundation (the delicate, flaky crust), adjust files to print properly (create a flavor-packed filling with just the right thickness), and print multiple jobs using the same process (pecan, apple, chocolate cream, etc.).

We’ve taken some time to research in-house color management processes at a variety of digital printing facilities over the past few months. Our findings show the same core principle is true in both printing and pie making: process is everything.

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